shoo shoo little bird

shoo shoo little bird
you're growin' up
it's time to go
begin venturing
farther from home

shoo shoo little bird
mama loves you
daddy too
it's time to go
spread your wings
for a test flight
and leave the nest

shoo shoo little bird
you can do it
we believe in you
it's time to go
stand on your own
apart from us
more and more

shoo shoo little bird
know home is waiting
a place to roost
the door is open
so are our arms
always there
to hold you tight
to catch you
when you fall
then it's time to go
once more

My first baby bird is growing up FAST! He'll start sixth grade in August. Gettin' So Grown Up. Not just in height. Though he is taller than his mama. Which isn't sayin' much. If ya met me in person, you'd find out I'm under five foot. On Sunday mornin', A few weeks ago now, he met up with a friend as we walked into service. The two sixth grade boys asked if they could sit together. I said yes, as did his friend's mother. As they had their heads together talkin', while walkin' down the hallway, I quickly reminded them both to Listen Up, Sit Up, Sing Out and Be Good. Then I walked on ahead of them to get my own seat before service started. As I was gettin' settled, who appeared at my elbow but my baby bird and his friend, wanting to slide in the pew alongside me and my husband's family. His usual spot. His friend's parents sat behind us. You know, those Good Seats In The Back of the church. Afterwards, when our sons had flown on to Sunday School, as had we, us parents got to talkin'. I said, "Here I tried to shoo my baby bird out of the nest and he circled right back to me." With a smile and a chuckle they replied, "Notice our son had no problem leaving the nest." Later that day, when we were at home, I asked my son why they sat next to me when they could have sat anywhere in the whole church that day. He said, "Well, Mom, I didn't want to sit by a STRANGER and I knew I could always sit by you." Oh. Well, of course you can. Always and Forever. I'll be here for you. In any way I can. Whenever you need me.

As if that vignette wasn't enough to inspire this poem, I have another story that is even more recent. I wrote, "shoo shoo little bird" yesterday as I waited for the doctor to come in to see my husband as he begins his fourth week of chemotherapy. He was tapping on his ipad. The sores in his mouth make talking painful. So we sat in companionable silence and waited together. In the back of my new Doctor Appointment Notebook I started making a list of posts I want to write for Turquoise Tangles. Among others I'd written, "my little bird" and then crossed it out and written, "Leaving the nest". Followed by a reminder note of,
@ church
shoo shoo little bird
*but come Home again to roost*

You see, yesterday morning my little bird set out Adverturing with his older cousin and his Papa, my dad. After a hearty homemade breakfast of scrambled eggs, bacon and half a buttered bagel we got his suitcase packed and loaded into the car. Stuffed in his suitcase, underneath the pants for workin', shorts and t-shirts for playin', clean underwear and toothbrush (which may or may not be used at all), was his pillow in his favorite green flannel pillow case. Carefully coiled on top of his pillow, and layered between his clothes, nestled his stuffed snake, Slinky, a very well traveled and much loved reptile. The Three Boys (ages 12, 11 and 64), took the train from where we live in central Illinois to Evergreen Heights, which sits high atop a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River in southern Illinois. My Heart Home, where my Grandpa, 95 years and counting, still resides in the house where he grew up in, then raised his family and where he and my Grandma built an amazing life together in their retirement years. My little bird was so excited to go. He flew away with a quick hug and a big grin while talkin' a mile a minute to his first cousin who's just a smidge older, a year and a half if you're keepin' track. Peas in a pod those two.

My baby bird, no longer a baby at all, will be in third grade in August. He's eight years old now, you know. He's enjoying being an only child for the three nights and four days his big brother is out of the nest. (Yes. I counted.) He had a special day with his grandparents yesterday and playin' with his good friend next door. This morning he gets to be the boss of the TV remote control, a rarity since his brother is always awake first. Life is good. All around. Chemotherapy and all. Being home together in our cozy nest is my favorite place of all. Chirp.

If you enjoyed readin', "shoo shoo little bird" you may also enjoy these three posts that tangle together with the thoughts shared here:

Sweet Talkin'
http://my.opera.com:80/jbaird/blog/2011/07/19/sweet-talkin

Wedding Anniversary
http://my.opera.com:80/jbaird/blog/2011/06/14/wedding-anniversary

Sunday mornin'
http://my.opera.com:80/jbaird/blog/2011/06/30/sunday-mornin

© 2011 Turquoise Tangles, Janean Baird

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24 thoughts on “shoo shoo little bird

  1. Mom writes:My throat is so constricted that I can't swallow my apple slices. It takes couage to give our children wings. Even as they become adults the urge is strong to pick them up, rock them and kiss the hurts away. Home is where the heart is…at every age. A safe, welcoming place. The door is always open!

  2. Mary K writes:Beautiful poem and beautiful comments between the poet and her mother.

  3. Dear Mom,This little bird, your first, is So Thankful for the nest you gave me as a chick and the one I'm welcomed back to anytime I fly your way. Day, night or in between. You more than anyone know the layers to this poem. I'm often Talkin' To Myself when I write. This poem is no exception. Writing helps me sort out all the tangles on the inside. I was a senior in high school the last time dad rocked me. I was broken hearted at the time and I still remember that moemnt all these years later. Like my sons, I'm A Very Lucky Little Bird. I hit The Parent Jackpot!Love,Janean

  4. Originally posted by anonymous:

    Mary K writes:Beautiful poem and beautiful comments between the poet and her mother.

    Thank you, Mary. For your kind words and for reading all the way to the bottom through the comments too. It's extra special since you know Mom and I in person too. Chirp.

  5. shoo shoo little birdyou're growin' upit's time to gobegin venturingfarther from home

    When I was 15, my father asked me: "When are you going to run away, so we have the house to ourselves again?""Not for a while, dad," was my answer.When I was 21 I started cycling around the world. Now I live in Thailand. Bet he wished he'd never said it! :DAs for the chemotherapy; I'm scared to comment. I hope life gets better. And I hope at some point I will feel freer to talk about it…

  6. Once again Janean makes a great writing. It's so inspiring me. Buzz my spirit. Thanks, dear.

  7. Shoo-Shoo little bird.And the Boy Time at Evergreen Heights was such a back yard club.Aunt Janet

  8. Originally posted by bentrein:

    shoo shoo little birdyou're growin' upit's time to gobegin venturingfarther from home

    When I was 15, my father asked me: "When are you going to run away, so we have the house to ourselves again?"
    "Not for a while, dad," was my answer.
    When I was 21 I started cycling around the world. Now I live in Thailand. Bet he wished he'd never said it! 😀

    As for the chemotherapy; I'm scared to comment. I hope life gets better. And I hope at some point I will feel freer to talk about it…

    Thank you, Ben, for commenting here and sharing your father's words and the irony of them all these years later. The question is whether or not you migrate home from time to time, even if it involves crossing oceans or long flights to get there? Thankfully the six weeks of chemotherapy are now completed. One week ago today my husband was unhooked from the medicine making him weak and sick, and hopefully killing the cancer cells , even as the radiation he also underwent shrunk the tumor. Now we wait. Surgery will follow. Sounds as if cancer has touched your life as well. It's a unique and personal journey. That much I know. Feels good to be logged in at Turquoise Tangles again today. I've missed you all and writing here. Time has slipped away and summer too in my absence. ~ Janean

  9. Originally posted by riehlife:

    Shoo-Shoo little bird.And the Boy Time at Evergreen Heights was such a back yard club.Aunt Janet

    Aunt Janet,I loved hearing pieces about the time my oldest son spent at Evergreen Heights with his cousin and Papa. They made memories that'll last for decades in those few brief days together high on the bluff. I know so, because my own childhood memories of time spent at that special place linger still. Love,Janean

  10. Originally posted by ligan0510:

    Once again Janean makes a great writing. It's so inspiring me. Buzz my spirit. Thanks, dear.

    Smiling at your spirit buzzing, Aidia. Thank YOU for your tweet review.

  11. Nice piece, Janean … and an interesting style, with it's beginnings in the mid 19th century and extending, growing, changing to our own days … though these new days seem a tad foreign to me now … I seem to be a 19th-century man in a 21st-century world that I both understand too well, and not at all. My sympathies with the chemo situation … I've been friendly with Unni in Norway through her difficulties, and now I find a fraternity brother of some 55 years is in the position of deciding whether to submit himself to the docs and their tortures or to fold his tent and steal away. I can help him not, as it is his trial, through which he must go alone. As must we all, I reckon. At that, I think my daughter had it easiest: by the time she was diagnosed there was no decision to be made. She went, brave on the outside, but I knew and know her better than any other human being, and her inside was far from at peace. We've spoken since, and you can take that as you wish, but she's better now, and at work on something I don't understand. I didn't make it to her in time, so I couldn't give her the small comfort of her daddy's arms, but that's my regret, not hers.In all, I've lost most of the lads I'm brothers with; I'm damned near the last one, and I'm only 72 … "only" I say, as though it weren't a ridiculous age for one to reach who took execrable care of his health and went about armed to the teeth in some very dicey places. As Mr Clemens said, "I know it, but I don't recognise it."Indeed, I meant, not to draw out the bad chances, but to wish your man only the good ones … "There is a destiny that shapes our ends", and all that … there has been so much bad luck in this thing, perhaps he will get one of the good bits. I hope so, and my prayers, if that is what they are, are with him. And you and your lads.And this is to make your wee birdie remember that brushing his teeth is a good policy:

  12. Dear der Wandersmann, I don't know where to start in replying to your wondrous post…so I will start with Thank You for sharing your insight into my poem and the other tangled topics that emerge in the story behind it. I am a bit old fashioned for my generation. I always have been. Preferring a slower pace than the world we live in. I always have. Part of me longs to be a Pioneer Girl, even though the Modern Girl appreciates her gas stove, dishwasher, washing machine and clothes dryer. I'd hang clothes on a clothes line in my backyard if it weren't against neighborhood codes to have one. My sympathies on your daughter's passing. So glad you've been in touch, from the other side. Dreams are a powerful thing. So are whispers from the wind. My parents sense my fear beneath the brave front too. It's A Parent Thing. Lucky us to know and be known so well. I agree with, "Only 72". You're a spring chicken still. Many decades ahead of you. That's the only way to roll. Keep going forward. Each cancer patient has their own story. Each treatment is as unique as the patient being treated. Faith, Hope and Love are seeing us through. Trusting in the Lord for strength and peace. The power of prayer and sharing our burden with those around us so it's light enough for us bear the weight of it. We are thankful. And blessed. Even now. Especially now. Oh, your teeth I presume?! My grandpa always had his teeth in a mug in the bathroom when my grandparents spent the night. A startling sight then, but somehow more so to punctuate your reminder for my children. Thank you. For reading all the way through my post. And commenting on each part of it. ~ Janean

  13. Originally posted by jbaird:

    The question is whether or not you migrate home from time to time, even if it involves crossing oceans or long flights to get there?

    Yes, indeed. I actually am home right now; and it looks like I'll be moving back in a year from now. But nothing is certain just yet…Originally posted by jbaird:

    Thankfully the six weeks of chemotherapy are now completed.

    I'm happy to hear that… Hope is great; especially when it's eventually full filled. Keep us posted?

  14. Originally posted by bentrein:

    Yes, indeed. I actually am home right now; and it looks like I'll be moving back in a year from now. But nothing is certain just yet…Hope is great; especially when it's eventually full filled. Keep us posted?

    How wonderful To Be Home. Sink in and enjoy every moment. One of my husbands doctors was outlining the treatment to come and began nearly every sentence with, "I am hopeful". Three of The Most Beautiful Words EVER. Yes. I will keep you posted. I can't help doing just that. It's such a part of my/our lives right now it'd coming pouring out of me anyway. Even if you were just readin' between the lines. ~ Janean

  15. A further note … perhaps your husband's mouth sores might be eased by sucking on something alkaline (There it goes again! Old pitcher for the Tigers: Al Kaline. Gettin' old is weird.), like, mebbe, milk of magnesia tablets, Tums or a cheap Wally World equivalent, etc. Sometimes the mint can be a little strenuous, but I think it sometimes burns out the pain nerves for a while, too.

  16. Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    A further note … perhaps your husband's mouth sores might be eased by sucking on something alkaline (There it goes again! Old pitcher for the Tigers: Al Kaline. Gettin' old is weird.), like, mebbe, milk of magnesia tablets, Tums or a cheap Wally World equivalent, etc. Sometimes the mint can be a little strenuous, but I think it sometimes burns out the pain nerves for a while, too.

    Thank you, dW, for stopping back by with this thoughtful suggestion. He made it through the mouth sores of summer with a variety of numbing concoctions. I don't know how, but sheer will and determination can get you far. Then in fall, while in the hospital for his first surgery he had to have an NG tube for a prolonged period of time. To spare you the details, and simplify as best I can, it's a tube down your nose and throat to your stomach in order to pumped out the stomach contents through your nose. Ew. He made the comment to a friend that the mouth sore of summer helped prepare him to endure the NG tube. He had not one, but two, and they were put in while he was awake. Awful. He had me leave the room. This time around with chemo, we are thankful that mouth sores aren't a side effect. No one more so than him. Two other suggestions, for you to pass on as needed, are using plastic silverware and pickles/pickle juice offering relief. Good thing he likes pickles! My best to you. So sorry/sad about Unni's passing, as the world was a more beautiful place with her in it. ~ Janean

  17. Ah … so the sore mouth was caused by an excess of alkaline substances, rather than t'other way 'round. Curious. I shall remember that.

  18. derWandersmann

    Well, the principle of chemotherapy is to kill cancer cells … these are our own cells with bad ideas, and luckily for us, they are a little less durable than the good cells … so chemo kills you … almost. But the cancer cells can't take it, and die. We hope. We're getting pretty good at it now, so mostly, it works.Similar to an old treatment for syphilis: they infect you with malaria. The principle being that the malaria raises the body temperature enough to kill the syphilis, but, with a bit of luck and care, it won't kill you. I really don't know if it worked.

  19. Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    Ah … so the sore mouth was caused by an excess of alkaline substances, rather than t'other way 'round. Curious. I shall remember that.

    dW, The summertime mouth sores were a side effect of the type of chemo he was on in conjunction with the radiation. They were like canker cores, but not just one or two, covering the inside of his mouth and throat and throughout his whole GI tract. I am staggered at all his body has endured in the past ten months since the end of last May when he was diagnosed. I always knew I'd married A Tough Guy, former USMC and current police officer, but he's made of stronger stuff than that even. Hopefully this information can help someone else in similar shoes someday, not that I'd wish it on anyone. Ever. ~ Janean

  20. Originally posted by greatZenaida:

    I think i just don't know about this topic, but i wishes you all the luck and support espc. you Janean…and hello to everyone…i guess we all know each others…small community!:)

    Smiles to you too, Zena. They are always wonderful to share. :)~ Janean

  21. Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    Well, the principle of chemotherapy is to kill cancer cells … these are our own cells with bad ideas, and luckily for us, they are a little less durable than the good cells … so chemo kills you … almost. But the cancer cells can't take it, and die. We hope. We're getting pretty good at it now, so mostly, it works.

    dW,Yes. We HOPE. I am glad none of my husband's doctors are statistic guys. They are talking about going for the cure. If there is no reoccurrence of cancer within five years he'll be considered cured. If there is, there are treatment options. Right now, we're living day by day and looking to May when the chemotherapy will be done. Just can't look further ahead than that in this moment. As for the second part of your medical history lesson, I had no idea. Amazing the things they thought of in the days before antibiotics. How awful if it didn't work to end up with BOTH of those maladies though. ~ Janean

  22. Originally posted by greatZenaida:

    The same to you…:) and yes indeed you are right their's always to learn and to share wonderful blog you have…i'll like your poems and great story about it…thank's :yes: :happy: and have gr8 weekend…:love: and peace…:up:

    Zena, Thank you for the compliment on my poetry and stories about what inspires them. Yesterday, March 29, 2012, was my blog's 1st birthday! Sounds silly to say aloud, but feels like A Big Deal, on the inside. Peace and Happy Weekend Wishes to you as well! ~ Janean

  23. I think i just don't know about this topic, but i wishes you all the luck and support espc. you Janean…and hello to everyone…i guess we all know each others…small community!:)

  24. The same to you…:) and yes indeed you are right their's always to learn and to share wonderful blog you have…i'll like your poems and great story about it…thank's :yes: :happy: and have gr8 weekend…:love: and peace…:up:

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